Intro to Ikebana

What to Bring

  • Low-rimmed dish or bowl to act as vase* (roughly the size of a soup bowl, must be watertight).
  • Keen ears and eyes to do your best flower-whispering with.

What to Wear

  • Casual (Warning: It might get messy)

Appropriate For

  • Everyone interested to learn Ikebana.

Intro to Ikebana

About This Class

Class Schedule

  • Thursday, 13 August 2015, 6:30 pm - 9:00 pm

What You Will Learn

  • Art of reading and arranging flowers in a way that pays respect to the characteristics of the individual stem as much as the principles of design.
  • Methods of Ikebana - the Japanese art of flower arranging.
  • Create botanical artworks that speak of the seasons and allow you to bring nature into your home.

What You Get

  • Brass Kenzan
  • Floral Scissors
  • Floral Adhesive
  • Flowers and floral materials

Description

Learn the art of reading and arranging flowers in a way that pays respect to the characteristics of the individual stem as much as the principles of design. Inspired by the methods of Ikebana (the Japanese art of flower arranging), along with the abundant flora of Brisbane’s surrounds, you will learn to create botanical artworks that speak of the seasons and allow you to bring nature into your home.

For this loose and airy style of vase arrangement, you will use a Kenzan (Japanese ikebana tool) as the anchor for your flowers. Bring a low-rimmed dish or bowl to act as your vase, and the rest will be supplied!

ABOUT ELIZA ROGERS

Classically trained at Southbank Institute of Technology (Brisbane, Australia), Eliza first learned the traditional skills and styles of floristry in her introductory work with flowers. At the completion of her studies, she travelled extensively across North America, acquiring a fresh, contemporary approach to the art of floral design along the way.

During her time in USA, she noticed a strong emphasis on the use of high quality, local, and seasonal flowers, along with the inclusion of unusual and oft-forgotten heirloom varieties. This made an impression on her there, and now influences her selection of blooms back home in Australia. In keeping with an ethos of connection to locality (along with her love of wild, unruly elements), Eliza keenly forages where she can, to incorporate a sense of wilderness and the surrounding environment within her work.

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